Meet Hannah G.

Hannah G. , 20

“Someone can look at Hannah and they can be like, ’Oh maybe she's not understanding,’” Drew, Hannah's brother, says, “but she understands a lot more than people give her credit for.” 

 

“I just like all the interesting things about her and she likes all the interesting things about me.” That sums up the deeply loving relationship between Drew and his younger sister, Hannah.

You should never judge a book by its cover, says Drew.

Both Amy and Drew brag about her incredible memory, evident in everything from remembering the dates when her favorite performers’ songs dropped to knowing the exact day of the week of any given date.

At 21, Hannah will soon transition out of the school system, moving on from all its supports.

“You're not going to have those resources at your fingertips,” any longer, says Amy who, with her husband, is coming up with a plan for Hannah’s future. It’s a journey common to many young adults with autism and their families.

“I have to make sure that she has activities to do and she's able to function, have the right resources in place and the right people to help her be successful,” says Amy.

She hopes to find someone who will accept Hannah and “give her a job and give her a chance,” says Amy.