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New Sites for CTN Study Announced

June 25, 2008

Autism Speaks, though its Clinical Trial Network (CTN), has long supported research aimed at finding treatments to ease the distress of people with autism. Now the CTN has added two new sites, CRCNJ in Voorhees, New Jersey and AMR-Baber Research in Naperville

Illinois, to the growing list of research centers participating in its Study of Fluoxetine in Autism (SOFIA).

The goal of the study, which follows successful earlier trials, is to examine the effectiveness of a new formulation of the medication in reducing repetitive behaviors commonly displayed by children and adolescents with autism. The SOFIA study features a melt-in-the-mouth formulation designed specifically for children and adults with autism. The sponsors of the study are seeking an FDA indication for the drug for treating this core symptom of autism.

Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) often prescribed under the brand name Prozac® to treat depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder and other conditions. The drug is designed to increase serotonin levels in the brain and may therefore address symptoms related to abnormal levels of serotonin observed in people with autism.

Researchers at both new sites are currently looking for children and adolescents between the ages of 5 and 17 years who meet the DSM-IV criteria for autistic disorder.

Interested parents local to Voorhees, New Jersey should contact Catherine Smith at CRCNJ on 856-346-1806 ext 106, or email her at csmith@thecnnh.org.

Interested parents near Naperville Illinois should contact Fauzia Manzoor, MD at AMR-Baber Research on 630-844-2095 or by email at manzoor@americanmedicalresearch.com.


Further information about the SOFIA program including answers to frequently asked questions can be found on the Autism Speaks website here.

More detailed information about the study as well as a list of participating sites may be found on the U.S National Institutes of Health website.

Read more on the study's FDA indication here.