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2011 Westchester/Fairfield Walk Now for Autism Speaks 

Thursday, June 9, 2011 View Comments

On Sunday June 5th, 15,000 people gathered for the 10th Anniversary celebration of the Westchester/Fairfield Walk Now for Autism Speaks

The Walk took place for the first time in its 10 year history on the campus of NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital-Westchester Division. 

The Walk’s new location at the Westchester Division of NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital coincides with the announcement of plans to develop the Institute for Brain Development there--a comprehensive, state-of-the-art institute dedicated to addressing the pressing clinical needs of individuals living with autism spectrum disorders and other developmental disorders of the brain across the lifespan. The Institute is a collaboration between NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital and its affiliated medical schools – Weill Cornell Medical College and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons – and The New York Center for Autism, and is expected to open in 2012. 

To date the Walk has raised $825,000 and is well on its way to its $1.1million goal! 

Autism Speaks would like to thank 2011 Westchester/Fairfield Honorary Co-Chairs Harry and Laura Slatkin for their time, energy and talent to make this the best Walk to date in Westchester/Fairfield. 

We would also like to thank our wonderful committee, sponsors, team captains, participants and supporters who helped make the day a true success. For more information about the Westchester/Fairfield Walk Now for Autism Speaks please visit: www.walknowforautismspeaks.org/westchesterfairfield

For more pictures of the Walk, visit our Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/AutismSpeaks.WestFair.

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