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Calls to Action

Autism Speaks House to Home Prize

Currently, 81% of adults with autism live with their aging parents. While there are many organizations and alliances dedicated to making the search for housing and community living easier, a major breakthrough that meets the escalating demand for homes and supports for those with autism is needed.

Autism Speaks sponsored the Autism Speaks House to Home Prize to bring about this breakthrough.

We are proud to announce the winners of the Autism Speaks House to Home Prize!

By the close of the challenge, we had received more than 250 entries. After careful review by our evaluation panel, which consisted of people with autism, family members of people with autism as well as service provider professionals, our three award recipients are as follows:

24/7 Support Category

CLO’s solution: "Neighborhood Network." Read their proposal here.
This prize was funded through generous donations to the Bobby Rosen Memorial Fund.

 

Neighborhood Network turns a typical neighborhood into a supportive community with smart-home technology, remote monitoring and social networks of professionally trained roommates, neighbors and families who live nearby. This combination of trained staff and technology is cost-effective because it provides customized care exactly when it is needed, right in a person’s own home. Learn more here: http://www.nnks.org.

Daily Support Category

JobPath’s solution: "Changing Housing Into Community (CHIC)." Read their proposal here.

 

Changing Housing Into Community (CHIC), is a parent collaborative that is creating a community for their adult children with autism – and an app called Pieced. Because human connection – an understanding of each person’s needs and wants ­– was often the missing piece when these families tried to put together services and supports, they proposed creating an app to find the community members and/or support staff to help.  Like a dating app or a job-networking website, Pieced will help young adults recruit and hire staff who are sensitive to their special needs and well-matched to their talents and interests. Learn more here: www.jobpathnyc.org.

Weekly Support Category

First Place AZ’s solution: "First Place." Read their proposal here.

First Place, a mixed-use prototype for young adults with autism, builds life, work and social skills by integrating three components:  integrated, residential units where residents live independently in a supportive environment; a Transition Academy that teaches vocational and life skills; and a leadership institute that facilitates research, informs public policy, and trains professionals and parents to help young adults with autism thrive. Residents become part of the community through jobs, continuing education, volunteer opportunities and recreation. Learn more here: www.FirstPlaceAZ.org

We would like to take this opportunity to thank all of the innovators who entered the challenge. While only three innovators are receiving the prizes above, there were so many other insightful solutions that we are confident many of the innovators in this challenge will do great things to shape the future of housing options for adults with autism. Thank you all for helping make this challenge a success. Autism Speaks has established networking groups on LinkedIn to help connect members of our community around specific adult-related themes. The Housing & Residential Supports Network has more than 1,500 members who are all focused on this issue. It's a great place to find other like-minded individuals, families and professionals to learn from one another and keep this conversation going. We encourage you to go to https://www.linkedin.com/groups/7448002/profile and request to join!

We would also like to thank all of our supporters, partners, commenters and anyone else who in any way contributed to our challenge community. Without you, we would not have had the successful challenge that we did. (We’d like to specifically acknowledge The Bobby Rosen Memorial Fund, Jill and Paul Haggerty, and the Boler Family Foundation who provided the funding for the Autism Speaks National Housing and Residential Support Survey that was instrumental in identifying the needs of those with autism and their families.