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environmental factors

Guest post by genetic epidemiologist Christine Ladd-Acosta. In her research, Dr. Ladd-Acosta collaborates with Dani Fallin, director of the Wendy Klag Center for Autism and Developmental Disabilities at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Posted by Alycia Halladay, PhD, Autism Speaks director for environmental research.

Researchers studying how environmental pollutants may contribute to autism are focusing on the epigenetic effects of these chemicals. They study the way chemicals affect the activity of genes. (I explain more about epigenetics here.)

This week’s “Got Questions?” answer is from Alycia Halladay, Ph.D., Autism Speaks director of research for environmental sciences.

While I was pregnant, I came in contact with a pesticide that has now been removed from the market. Could this have been one of the reasons my child has autism?