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Calls to Action

Ph.D.

Studies of a serotonin transporter (5HTT) mutation associates with Asperger's syndrome

Matthew Beckman, University of Alabama at Birmingham (Young Investigator)

In 2003, NAAR committed approximately $4.9 million to fund 35 pilot studies, 13 pre- and post-doctoral fellowships and two autism training programs. NAAR's 2003 research commitments funded autism investigations in the U.S., Canada, England, Scotland and Denmark. As part of the 2003 awards, NAAR is co-sponsoring two autism training programs in partnership with the Canadian Institute of Neurosciences, Mental Health and Addiction.

2003 PILOT STUDY GRANTS

Research Funded: 2004

In 2004, NAAR committed $6.2 million to fund 25 pilot studies, 14 pre- and post-doctoral fellowships as well as two large collaborative programs: the NAAR Autism Genome Project and expansion of the Autism Tissue Program. In addition, NAAR's 2004 research commitments include the ongoing support of two interdisciplinary autism training programs that are being co-sponsored by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Synaptogenesis and chromosomal rearrangements in autism

Thomas Bourgeron, Ph. D., Pasteur Institute (Pilot Project)

Molecular Studies in Autism

Huda Zoghbi, M.D., Baylor College of Medicine (Genius Award)
The funds received through the Cure Autism Now Genius Award will allow us to explore new approaches to identify some of the molecular genetic pathways involved in autism. Our strategy will focus on the following hypothesis: Genes that are key in mediating prominent phenotypes seen in autistic patients are likely to be mutated, at least, in a subset of autism patients. A two-pronged approach will be taken to hone in on the most promising candidate pathways.

In 2005, NAAR committed $8.3 million to fund 41 pilot studies, 14 pre- and 7 post-doctoral fellowships as well as three large collaborative programs: the NAAR Autism Genome Project, the High Risk Baby Siblings Research Project and the Autism Tissue Program. In addition, NAAR's 2005 research commitments include the ongoing support of two interdisciplinary autism training programs that are being co-sponsored by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.
Grants Funded by Cure Autism Now - 2005 Genetics: Searching DNA for mutations that will point to proteins and pathways that may be amenable to treatment

The Prevalence of Mutations in X-Chromosome Linked Genes (Pilot Project Award)
Jozef Gecz, Ph.D., Women's and Children's Hospital, Australia

Cure Autism Now funded a variety of science programs designed to encourage innovative approaches toward identifying the causes, developing means of prevention and treatment and ultimately, finding a cure for autism and related disorders.

Field-building research grants were a core feature of Cure Autism Now's science program: Pilot Project, Young Investigator, Treatment, and Innovative Technology in Autism grants were born out of the necessity to stimulate novel research and entice investigators to join the fight to understand autism.