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Calls to Action

Joe Horrigan

June 05, 2012

This Thursday, June 7, Autism Speaks Head of Medical Research Joe Horrigan, M.D., will host Autism Speaks monthly "The Doctors Are In" webchat at 3 pm ET/noon PT. Dr. Horrigan, a clinical child and adolescent psychiatrist, will be joined by guest hosts Dan Coury, M.D., medical director of Autism Speaks Autism Treatment Network (ATN), and ATN Program Director Nancy Jones, Ph.D.


This week’s “Got Questions” answer comes from pediatric psychiatrist Joseph Horrigan, M.D., Autism Speaks assistant vice president, head of medical research.
 


 
Please join us Thursday Feb. 2nd for “The Doctors Are In!” the next in our ongoing series of monthly webchats co-hosted by Autism Speaks Chief Science Officer Geri Dawson, Ph.D., and our Assistant Vice President, Head of Medical Research Joe Horrigan, M.D.
 

December 21, 2011

 Researchers have identified a class of compounds that, when administered to mouse models of Angelman syndrome, activate production of a brain protein whose absence causes this relatively rare condition. Often classified as an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), Angelman syndrome is marked by developmental delay, lack of speech, seizures and motor difficulties.


 
This week’s “Got Questions” answer comes from Joseph Horrigan, MD, Autism Speaks assistant vice president, head of medical research.
 
First, it’s important to note that medicines for treating autism are most effective when used in conjunction with behavioral therapies. Ideally, medicines are a complement to other treatment strategies.