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Harvard

Can EEG Identify Which High Risk Baby Sibs Need Intervention?

Study of infant brain activity in families affected by autism finds signs of “miswiring” that may help identify babies at highest risk
May 15, 2014

Harvard researchers studying babies in families affected by autism say they’ve found two distinctive types of electroencephalogram (EEG) readings that, together, may pinpoint which of these infants are at the highest risk of developing the disorder. They are presenting their findings this week at the International Meeting for Autism Research (IMFAR), in Atlanta.

Costs of Autism: Study Tallies Kids’ Higher Health and Education Needs

Harvard researchers find substantial costs in healthcare and education; more in-depth findings to come from Autism Speaks
February 10, 2014

Harvard researchers estimate that the added costs of autism-related healthcare and education average more than $17,000 per child per year in the United States. The figure represents expenses above those for a child without autism spectrum disorder (ASD). On a national level, the researchers estimated that these additional costs exceeded $11.5 billion in 2011.

Do Medical Problems Reveal Autism Subtypes?

Harvard study suggests subgroups of children with autism share health problems; separate Autism Speaks study promises further insights
February 03, 2014

A Harvard Medical School analysis of electronic medical records suggests that some children with autism fall into one of three distinct subgroups based on common medical issues.

* Those in the first group have seizures, or epilepsy.

Dennis Wall Wins IMFAR Award for Research on Quick Diagnostic Test

Promising diagnostic test for autism asks parents to answer 7 questions and upload short home video; more families needed to participate
May 09, 2013

 

With a simple checklist, college students quickly and accurately rated home videos such as this one for autism-related behaviors.

Harvard Prof Loses Mustache for Autism Speaks


Posted by Kristin Concannon, research coordinator for the Infant Sibling Project, Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience, Children’s Hospital, Boston (second from right, back row).
 
My work gives me the opportunity to witness the importance of autism research first hand—through our work with affected children and their families.