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epigenetics

The highlights of an unprecedented year in advancing diagnosis, prevention and treatment of autism and its associated medical conditions
December 18, 2013

The year 2013 brought signs of a gratifying maturation in autism research. This went beyond the unmistakable increase in the sheer number of autism studies making headlines. Many of the year’s most important advances used new technologies and built on the foundation of knowledge established by years of investment in basic research.

New study uses brain tissue to deepen understanding of the roles that genetics and environment play in autism spectrum disorder
September 06, 2013

A new study using human brain tissue from the Autism Tissue Program (ATP), an Autism Speaks translational research program, identifies new genes of interest in understanding the genetic and environmental interaction in ASD. Appearing in the recent issue of Molecular Psychiatry, the study conducted by six researchers from Johns Hopkins, analyzed tissue from multiple areas of the brain known to be affected by autism.

Global Autism Science and Advocacy Organization Advances Research in Epigenetic and Gene-Environment Influences, Neurobiology, and Studies Concerning Adolescents and Adults with Autism

Autism Speaks announced the awarding of 47 new research grants totaling $13,242,279 in funding over the next three years. Grants awarde

December 21, 2011

New York, N.Y. (December 21, 2011) – Autism Speaks, the world’s largest autism science and advocacy organization, today announced the awarding of 47 new research grants totaling $13,242,279 in funding over the next three years. Grants awarded this year not only respond to Autism Speaks funding priorities, but collectively move autism research forward toward improving diagnosis and treatment and quality of life for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Findings suggest how genes and environmental stresses may interact to cause autism
November 07, 2011

 

  In recent years, scientists have identified rare genetic mutations that in and of themselves can produce autism. They have likewise found a large number of genetic changes that increase the risk that a child will develop this disorder. However, fewer than 20 percent of those with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) harbor identifiable gene defects directly related to the disease.