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Study of infant brain activity in families affected by autism finds signs of “miswiring” that may help identify babies at highest risk
May 15, 2014

Harvard researchers studying babies in families affected by autism say they’ve found two distinctive types of electroencephalogram (EEG) readings that, together, may pinpoint which of these infants are at the highest risk of developing the disorder. They are presenting their findings this week at the International Meeting for Autism Research (IMFAR), in Atlanta.

Researchers find ethnic disparities in services for autism-related medical issues; Autism Speaks working to close the gap
June 17, 2013

 

In today’s issue of Pediatrics, researchers report stark racial differences in the likelihood that children with autism receive specialty care for related medical conditions. Autism is commonly associated with a range of health conditions such as GI disorders, sleep disturbance and epilepsy.

June 29, 2012

A new study shows that infants as young as 6 months who are siblings of children with autism have different patterns of brain activity compared to infants who do not have a sibling with autism. These differences in brain activity were present even in infant siblings who did not go on to develop autism. Thus, they may reflect genetic differences that are shared by children with autism and their younger siblings.