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Researchers say greater focus on repetitive behaviors may help identify babies and toddlers who will benefit from early intervention
May 15, 2014

A greater focus on very early repetitive behaviors may help identify more babies and toddlers who would benefit from early intervention for autism, a new study suggests.

Conditional neurotrophin knock-out mice as a model for the developmental neuropathology of autism

Schahram Akbarian, Ph.D., Massachusetts General Hospital (Young Investigator)

Cure Autism Now funded a variety of science programs designed to encourage innovative approaches toward identifying the causes, developing means of prevention and treatment and ultimately, finding a cure for autism and related disorders.

Field-building research grants were a core feature of Cure Autism Now's science program: Pilot Project, Young Investigator, Treatment, and Innovative Technology in Autism grants were born out of the necessity to stimulate novel research and entice investigators to join the fight to understand autism.