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autism study

Injury to small brain region during pregnancy or birth may disrupt development of important cross wiring to other brain regions
September 09, 2014

A new review of research suggests that a small brain region largely known for coordinating movement could play the largest nongenetic role in autism’s development.

A team of Princeton neuroscientists present their idea – based on a new interpretation of extensive autism research – in the journal Neuron.

In pilot study, parents deliver “Infant Start” intervention for babies with signs of autism; symptoms significantly reduced by age 3
September 09, 2014

In a small pilot study, parents learned and delivered a treatment that significantly reduced autism symptoms in babies who had shown warning signs for the disorder.

Study by Autism Speaks Weatherstone fellow demonstrates effectiveness of program to expand delivery of autism services via the Internet
August 05, 2014

 

Inflammation is the body’s vital infection-fighting response, but chronic inflammation can harm the brain as well as body
July 23, 2014

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In today’s online edition of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), science writer M.J. Friedrich interviews several leading researchers studying inflammation’s role in the development of brain disorders and psychiatric illnesses.

Findings implicate faulty transport of fatty acids in brain; suggest opportunity for developing treatment for one subtype of autism
July 16, 2014

Neuroscientists at Japan’s RIKEN Brain Science Institute report evidence that problems in the brain’s fatty acid transport system cause or contribute to autism in some individuals. 

First study on adult drivers with autism reveals self-perceived challenges and self-imposed limits; can tailored driver education help?
June 30, 2014

 

As the number of adults with autism rapidly grows, a new study suggests a range of self-reported difficulties that might be addressed by tailored training to support safe driving – a key to independence for many adults.