Autism Speaks at the International Meeting for Autism Research (IMFAR)

Date: 
May 01, 2013
Public invited to live streaming of IMFAR press conference; daily news reports and blogs

Autism Speaks is pleased to be a continuing sponsor of the International Meeting for Autism Research (IMFAR). This year’s annual meeting is being held in San Sebastian, Spain, May 2 – 4.

Register to view on-demand video of press conference:
At a pre-meeting press conference, seven autism researchers described new findings of particular interest to both the scientific community and the public. Both the media and the public are invited to register to view an on-demand webcast of the press conference, which took place at noon EDT on May 1. If you are not a member of the media, please write “autism community” in the space for designated company. Register for access here.

In 2001, the co-founders of Cure Autism Now and the National Alliance for Autism Research sponsored the first IMFAR. Both organizations merged with Autism Speaks to create the world’s leading autism research and advocacy organization.

Stay tuned to Autism Speaks science news and blogs for daily IMFAR coverage.

IMFAR Press Conference Photos from Wednesday, May 1st, 2013 ...

 

Previous Slide 1/11 Next Autism Speaks Vice President for Communications and Awareness Dana Marnane opened the press conference. INSAR President Helen Tager Flusberg. IMFAR Meeting Chair Joaquin Fuentes welcomed attendees to Spain. The panelists described noteworthy results from trials that spanned the fields of autism genetics that spanned many field of autism research – from genetics to treatment. Ami Klin of Emory Universty Marcus Autism Center.   Kevin Pelphrey of the Yale Child Study Center described insights from noninvasive brain scans before during and after Pivotal Response Therapy. Wendy Goldberg of the University of California Irvine described a study revealing positive attitudes among college students toward fellow students with autism. Connie Kasari described research results suggesting that speech generating devices can speed gains in spoken language in school children with autism and limited verbal skills. Ronnie the Robot joined Notre Dame research Jason Diehl to illustrate a study suggesting that technology can help individuals with autism better socialize with humans. Live web streaming allowed reporters investigators and other members of the autism community to join those at the press conference. News stories on the press conference's presentations and more will appear on the Autism Speaks website during the IMFAR conference.