Autism Speaks Statement on Proposed Revisions to the DSM Definition of Autism Spectrum Disorder

February 2, 2012

Autism Speaks is concerned that planned revisions to the definition of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may restrict diagnoses in ways that may deny vital medical treatments and social services to some people on the autism spectrum. These revisions concern the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), scheduled for publication in spring 2013.

We have voiced our concerns and will continue to directly communicate with the DSM-5 committee to ensure that the proposed revision does not discriminate against anyone living with autism. While the committee has stated that its intent is to better capture all who meet current diagnostic criteria, we have concluded that the real-life impact of the revisions has, to date, been insufficiently evaluated.

Autism Speaks is committing substantial effort and resources to fund definitive research to ensure that the final definition of ASD meets the following criteria:

1. Assures that all those who struggle with autism symptoms receive the treatment, services and benefits they need, without discrimination;

2. Affirms that ASD can be a lifelong diagnosis, while allowing for treatment and services to change with an individual’s evolving needs;

3. Supports the importance of early ASD diagnosis and treatment as essential for helping individuals achieve their best possible outcomes and avoids creating barriers.

As the proposed diagnostic criteria are evaluated over the course of 2012, Autism Speaks will be working with leading experts in the field as well as community stakeholders to evaluate the potential impact of the DSM revision on our community and to ensure that all necessary adjustments be made to assure access to vital treatment and social support resources for all those who struggle with the symptoms of autism.

At the same time, we will actively serve as an informational resource and advocate for all members of our community, as they seek to make their needs known and understand how the evolving changes will affect them and their families.

For more information, please see our DSM-5 “frequently asked questions" page.