Skip navigation

Calls to Action

Ruling That Could Change Everything For Disabled People With Trusts

When Judge Kristin Booth Glen walked into her Manhattan Surrogate's courtroom one day in 2007, she had no idea she was about to challenge the nation's top banks on behalf of tens of thousands of disabled people.

Before her stood lawyer Harvey J. Platt, who was petitioning to become the legal guardian of Mark Christopher Holman, a severely autistic teen who lived in an institution upstate.

Holman had been left an orphan nearly three years earlier after the eccentric millionaire who adopted him passed away. According to doctors, he had the communication skills of a toddler, unable to bathe, dress, or eat by himself.

But before Judge Glen would grant this seemingly perfunctory petition, she had a few questions for Platt.

"How often have you visited Mark Holman?" she asked the lawyer.

"Since his mother died, I have not visited him," said Platt.

"And when you say you haven't visited him since then, how often had you visited him prior to that?"

To continue reading, visit here.


Courtesy Sharon Awad
Mark Holman, millionaire orphan

Check out some of our related resources:

Your Child's Rights

Adult Services

Legal Resource Center

Search our Resource Guide for Advocacy, Financial and Legal Resources