Special Education and Advocacy

Last month, we focused on the transition back to school. We heard from many families who wanted us to highlight ways they could play a part in their child's education.

One parent wrote, "I want to make sure my child is making educational progress and having a good experience at school. What can I do to make sure this happens?"
As a parent of a child with autism, you are your child's most passionate advocate. As an important member of their school team, you can advocate for their education to ensure their rights are not violated. This month's Community Connections tells you how best to advocate for your child's education by taking an active role in the process!

Starting A New IEP Advocacy Year: Back to School Tips
In this article, Lisa Krizman shares tips about advocacy supplies, monitoring programs, and important legal developments in special education.

Developing A Great IEP, with Gary Mayerson
This free two-part 12- minute video provides important information for parents who are encountering the IEP process for the first time, as well as tips for parents who have been through the process before.



Resources

Wrightslaw Special Education Law and Advocacy
Accurate, reliable information about special education law, education law and advocacy for children with disabilities.

A Parent's Guide to Special Ed/Special Needs
The Council for Disability Rights

Building the Legacy: IDEA 2004
The United State Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs' (OSEP's) IDEA Website

The Council for Disability Rights Glossary of Special Education Terms
Prepared by Dr. Joy J. Rogers, Professor, Loyola University School of Education

Special Ed Connection
Stay connected to everything happening in special education.

Question and Answer Session about Federal Legal Appeals Project
Gary Mayerson, FLAP Director

Beyond IEP's: Eight Ways Parents Can Help Advocate for Children with Autism
Adapted from Saint Louis Autism and Parenting Examiner

Visit our Resource Guide to search for Special Education information and regulations specific to your state, or to find attorneys and advocates in your area. We welcome new submissions to continually build the Resource Guide. If you know of any additional advocacy resources available, you can submit them here.

We would like to hear from you! Share your experience with special education advocacy and law by e-mailing familyservices@autismspeaks.org.

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