Autism in the News - 02.09.12

Thursday, February 9, 2012 View Comments walknowforautismspeaks

Former Autism Society director charged in $60K theft (Atlanta Business Chronicle) The former executive director of the Autism Society of America’s Greater Georgia Chapter is charged with taking more than $60,000 from the organization, reports the Gwinnett Daily Post. Read more.

People with autism deserve better (Ireland) I am extremely disappointed with the response of your paper to the calls for a retraction and apology regarding the wildly inaccurate article written by Dr Tony Humphreys (Feelgood). Read more.

Wellington Elementary staff raises awareness of autism (The News Connection) Wellington Elementary staff enjoyed the hospitality of Trietsch Memorial United Methodist Church's mini-movie theatre on the Jan. 13 teacher workday. Nothing like movie theatre popcorn and a big screen showing of "Temple Grandin" to get the staff thinking about how they can modify and accommodate instruction for students with autism and Asperger's syndrome. "Temple Grandin" is the true story of one woman, diagnosed with autism as a child, who persevered through the struggles and isolating challenges of autism at a time when it was still a relatively unknown developmental disorder. Read more.

A Wooden Robot That Teaches Autistic Kids To Recognize Emotions (Fast Co Design) Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) contend with a range of social and behavioral setbacks, including the challenge of identifying and expressing emotions. Build-A-Robot from Plan Toys was designed to help, with four interchangeable heads that can be used to teach kids to identify and express happiness, sadness, anger, and surprise. Read more.

Immigration saga ends poorly (Chilliwack Times) A Chilliwack man whose daughter's autism led to his family being refused entry to Canada has returned to India. Read more.

Autism Speaks’ daily blog “Autism in the News” is a mix of top news stories of the day. Autism Speaks does not vet the stories and the views contained therein do not necessarily reflect Autism Speaks beliefs or point of view.