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Autism Apps

Do you have a favorite autism app you'd like to add to this list? Please email a brief description of the app, including the platform, cost, age group, price, any related research, and a link to FSDB@AutismSpeaks.org and we would be happy to share your recommendation with the Autism Speaks community!

Apps are listed in alphabetical order. You can sort apps by rating by clicking the "Rating" link above that column. You can rate apps by first clicking on the app name to visit the app detail page. Then, below the description of the app, click on the number of stars for your rating of the app.

Apps now have a research rating:

 Anecdotal = No specific or related scientific studies for this type of app.  

 Research = There are some related scientific studies, but no direct research support for this type of app or technology.

 Evidence = There is solid or specific scientific evidence that this type of app or technology is helpful.

Namesort icon Category Platform Age Supporting Research Rating
Touch & Say
  • Social Skills
  • iPad
  • Anecdotal

The Use and Understnading of Virtual Environments by Adolescents with Autistic Spectrum Disorders

The potential of virtual environments for teaching people with autism has been positively promoted in recent years. The present study aimed to systematically investigate this potential with 12 participants with autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs), each individually matched with comparison participants according to either verbal IQ or performance IQ, as well as gender and chronological age. Participants practised using a desktop ?training? virtual environment, before completing a number of tasks in a virtual caf

Toontastic
  • Language
  • iPad
  • Anecdotal
TonePad
  • Creative Arts
  • iPad
  • iPhone
  • iTouch
  • Anecdotal
Tom Taps
  • Communication
  • iPad
  • Preschool (2-5)
  • Children (6-12)
Toddler Sing & Learn
  • Creative Arts
  • iPad
  • iPhone
  • iTouch
  • Anecdotal
Toca Tea Party
  • Recreation
  • iPad
  • Anecdotal

The Use and Understnading of Virtual Environments by Adolescents with Autistic Spectrum Disorders

The potential of virtual environments for teaching people with autism has been positively promoted in recent years. The present study aimed to systematically investigate this potential with 12 participants with autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs), each individually matched with comparison participants according to either verbal IQ or performance IQ, as well as gender and chronological age. Participants practised using a desktop ?training? virtual environment, before completing a number of tasks in a virtual caf

Toca Boca
  • Recreation
  • iPad
  • iPhone
  • iTouch
  • Anecdotal
TOBY Playpad
  • Social Skills
  • Behavioral Intervention
  • Language
  • iPad
  • Research

Effectiveness of a multimedia programme and therapist-instructed training for children with autism

The present study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of an interactive multimedia training programme and a conventional therapist-instructed training in improving the learning behaviours of children with autism. A multiple-subject, single case-study time-series research design was adopted in the study. Six children with autism, aged 2 years 4 months to 2 years 10 months, were recruited by convenience sampling. They attended a 12-session training programme on basic concepts (e.g.

Time Timer Apps
  • Organizer
  • iPad
  • iPhone
  • iTouch
  • Anecdotal

Do PDAs enhance the organization and memory skills of students with cognitive disabilities?

The project studied the on-time behavior of 35 students with intellectual disabilities (ID) or traumatic brain injury (TBI) under three conditions ? times and tasks list, paper planner, and two different personal data assistants (PDAs). Students participated for two 4-week periods, receiving one morning reminder during Period 1 and no reminders during Period 2. Students were on time more often using a PDA compared to a list (p < .024) or a planner (p < .002). Students were on time 50% more often in Period 1 with a single daily morning reminder as compared to no reminder across all conditions.

Tim(mer) Stock - Simple Timer to Keep Track of Time
  • Functional Skills
  • Organizer
  • Android
  • All Ages
  • Anecdotal
Thomas Game Pack
  • Recreation
  • Android
  • iPad
  • iPhone
  • iTouch
  • Anecdotal
therapyConnect
  • Communication
  • Language
  • Math Skills
  • Organizer
  • iPad
  • All Ages
  • Anecdotal
The Zones of Regulation
  • Social Skills
  • Behavioral Intervention
  • Windows Phone
  • Android
  • iPad
  • iPhone
  • iTouch
  • All Ages
  • Research

A Context-Senitive Device to Help People with Autism Cope with Anxiety

We describe a smartphone application that helps people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) cope with anxiety attacks. Our prototype provides a one-touch interface for indicating a panic level. The device's response - to instruct, soothe, and/or contact carers - is sensitive to the user's context, consisting of time, location, ambient noise, and nearby friends. Formative evaluation unearths a critical challenge to building assistive technologies for ASD sufferers: can regimented interfaces foster flexible behaviour?

The Urinal Game
  • Social Skills
  • iPad
  • iPhone
  • iTouch
  • Anecdotal

Using Virtual Environments for Teaching Social Understanding to 6 Adolescents with Autistic Spectrum Disorders

Six teenagers with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) experienced a Virtual Environment (VE) of a café. They also watched three sets of videos of real cafés and buses and judged where they would sit and explained why. Half of the participants received their VE experience between the first and second sets of videos, and half experienced it between the second and third. Ten naïve raters independently coded participants’ judgments and reasoning.

The Tree I See - Interactive Storybook
  • Social Skills
  • iPad
  • iPhone
  • iTouch
  • Research

Do adolescents with autistic spectrum disorders adhere to social conventions in virtual environments?

The potential for using virtual environments (VEs) in educational contexts for people with autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs) has been recognized. However, very little is known about how people with ASDs interpret and understand VEs. This study aimed to investigate this directly with a group of 12 adolescents with ASDs, each individually matched with comparison participants.