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Calls to Action

Autism Apps

Do you have a favorite autism app you'd like to add to this list? Please email a brief description of the app, including the platform, cost, age group, price, any related research, and a link to FSDB@AutismSpeaks.org and we would be happy to share your recommendation with the Autism Speaks community!

Apps are listed in alphabetical order. You can sort apps by rating by clicking the "Rating" link above that column. You can rate apps by first clicking on the app name to visit the app detail page. Then, below the description of the app, click on the number of stars for your rating of the app.

Apps now have a research rating:

 Anecdotal = No specific or related scientific studies for this type of app.  

 Research = There are some related scientific studies, but no direct research support for this type of app or technology.

 Evidence = There is solid or specific scientific evidence that this type of app or technology is helpful.

Namesort icon Category Platform Age Supporting Research Rating
SonicPics
  • Social Skills
  • iPad
  • iPhone
  • iTouch
  • Anecdotal
Sosh: Improving Social Skills with Children and Adolescents
  • Social Skills
  • iPad
  • iPhone
  • iTouch
  • Anecdotal

Using Virtual Environments for Teaching Social Understanding to 6 Adolescents with Autistic Spectrum Disorders

Six teenagers with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) experienced a Virtual Environment (VE) of a café. They also watched three sets of videos of real cafés and buses and judged where they would sit and explained why. Half of the participants received their VE experience between the first and second sets of videos, and half experienced it between the second and third. Ten naïve raters independently coded participants’ judgments and reasoning.

SoundingBoard
  • Communication
  • iPad
  • iPhone
  • iTouch
  • Anecdotal
SoundTouch
  • Language
  • iPad
  • iPhone
  • iTouch
  • Evidence

Brief report: vocabulary acquisition for children with autism: teacher or computer instruction.

This study examined the impact of computers on the vocabulary acquisition of young children with autism. Children's attention, motivation, and learning of words was compared in a behavioral program and an educational software program. The educational software program was designed to parallel the behavioral program, but it added perceptually salient qualities such as interesting sounds and object movement. Children with autism were more attentive, more motivated, and learned more vocabulary in the computer than in the behavioral program.

Sparky the Shark: Interactive Storybook for Children
  • Recreation
  • iPad
  • Anecdotal
Speak for Yourself AAC
  • Communication
  • Android
  • iPad
  • All Ages
  • Anecdotal
Speak it!
  • Communication
  • iPad
  • iPhone
  • iTouch
  • Anecdotal
Speak4it
  • Functional Skills
  • iPad
  • iPhone
  • iTouch
  • Anecdotal
SpeakAll!
  • Communication
  • iPad
  • All Ages
SpeakColors Español Pro
  • Language
  • iPad
  • Preschool (2-5)
  • Children (6-12)
  • Anecdotal
SpeakColorsHD
  • Language
  • iPad
  • Anecdotal
Special Numbers
  • Functional Skills
  • Math Skills
  • iPad
  • iPhone
  • iTouch
  • Preschool (2-5)
  • Children (6-12)
Special Stories
  • Social Skills
  • Communication
  • Functional Skills
  • Language
  • Android
  • iPad
  • iPhone
  • iTouch
  • Preschool (2-5)
  • Children (6-12)
Special Words
  • Communication
  • Functional Skills
  • Language
  • Android
  • iPad
  • iPhone
  • iTouch
  • Preschool (2-5)
  • Children (6-12)
Speech Cards Professional
  • Language
  • iPad
  • Research

Comparison of the Effects of SMART Board Technology and Flash Card Instruction on Sigh Word Recognition and Observational Learning

This study compared the effectiveness of SMART Board, interactive whiteboard technology and traditional flash cards in teaching reading in a small-group instructional arrangement. Three students with moderate intellectual disabilities were taught to read grocery store aisle marker words under each condition. Observational learning (students learning other group members' words) was also assessed across each condition. The effectiveness of the two procedures was evaluated using an adapted alternating-treatments design (AATD) across two conditions and replicated across students.