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Research

We conducted a systematic review of studies that involved iPods(®), iPads(®), and related devices (e.g., iPhones(®)) in teaching programs for individuals with developmental disabilities. The search yielded 15 studies covering five domains: (a) academic, (b) communication, (c) employment, (d) leisure, and (e) transitioning across school settings. The 15 studies reported outcomes for 47 participants, who ranged from 4 to 27 years of age and had a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and/or intellectual disability.

This study compares intervention delivered by a therapist to intervention delivered using an iPad for two children with autism. Further, this study evaluates the influence of choice between the conditions. Methods: Time on-task, challenging behaviour, session duration and correct responses were compared across conditions in an alternating treatment design. The effect of choice was evaluated in an ABAB design. Results: The iPad was associated with shorter intervention sessions, more time on-task and less challenging behaviour for one participant.

While much research has examined the development of facial recognition abilities, less is known about the ability of individuals with and without autism to categorize facial gender. The current study tested gender categorization abilities in high-functioning children (5-7 and 8-12 years), adolescents (13-17 years), and adults (18-53 years) with autism and matched controls. Naturalistic videos depicted faces that were either typical or less typical of each gender. Both groups improved in their performance across development.

There is a growing amount of evidence suggesting that individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) differ in the way in which they cognitively process information. A critical aspect of cognitive processing that is receiving more attention in studies of ASD is categorization. The studies presented here examined the effect of typicality on categorization of objects and gender in high-functioning children, adolescents, and adults with ASD and matched controls.

This study examined the effect of exemplar typicality on reaction time and accuracy of categorization. High-functioning children (age 9-12), adolescents (age 13-16), and adults with autism (age 17-48) and matched controls were tested in a category verification procedure. All groups showed improved processing throughout the lifespan for typical and somewhat typical category exemplars. However, individuals with autism responded more slowly than matched controls to atypical exemplars at all ages.

When the studying is done, or simply a brain-break is needed, Learn with Rufus: Fun and Games provides a little fun and frivolity. We have taken the "toys" from each of our previous Learn with Rufus apps and brought them all together in one delightful, little, free package. Learn with Rufus: Fun and Games was designed by Dr Holly Gastgeb, a licensed clinical and developmental psychologist with over ten years of experience working with typically developing children and children with autism spectrum disorder. 

Category: 
Recreation
Creative Arts
Platform: 
Android
iPad
iPhone
iTouch
Age: 
All Ages
Research Type: 
Research
Cost: 
$0.00

Learn with Rufus: Numbers and Counting aims to help children to prepare for kindergarten. Children will learn the sequence of numbers, both forwards and backwards, and how to compare quantities (more and less) of various objects.

Category: 
Math Skills
Platform: 
Android
iPad
iPhone
iTouch
Age: 
Preschool (2-5)
Children (6-12)
Research Type: 
Research
Cost: 
$0.99

aacorn is the world's first 'intelligent' augmentative assistive communications solution (AAC) for children with autism, apraxia, downs, ms, developmentally delayed language - and their families.

Category: 
Communication
Language
Platform: 
iPad
Age: 
All Ages
Research Type: 
Research
Cost: 
$189.00